Archive for February, 2014

HTTrack – download entire websites to your harddrive

Saturday, February 22nd, 2014

HTTrack is a free (GPL, libre/free software) and easy-to-use offline browser utility. It allows you to download a World Wide Web site from the Internet to a local directory, building recursively all directories, getting HTML, images, and other files from the server to your computer. HTTrack arranges the original site’s relative link-structure. Simply open a page of the ‘mirrored’ website in your browser, and you can browse the site from link to link, as if you were viewing it online. HTTrack can also update an existing mirrored site, and resume interrupted downloads. HTTrack is fully configurable, and has an integrated help system. WinHTTrack is the Windows 2000/XP/Vista/Seven/8 release of HTTrack, and WebHTTrack the Linux/Unix/BSD release.

Downoad for free at http://www.httrack.com/page/2/en/index.html

Chakras

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

In Hindu metaphysical and tantric/yogic traditions and other belief systems chakras are points or knots, in the subtle body. They are located at the physical counterparts of the major plexuses of arteries, veins and nerves. Chakras are part of the subtle body, not the physical body, and as such are the meeting points of the subtle (non-physical) energy channels, called nadiis. Nadiis are channels in the subtle body through which the life force (prana), or vital energy moves. Various scriptural texts and teachings present a different number of chakras. There are many chakras in the subtle human body according to the tantric texts, but there are 6 chakras and 7th(sahasrara) is the state which are considered to be the most important ones.

Their name derives from the Sanskrit word for “wheel” or “turning”, but in yogic context a better translation of the word is ‘vortex or whirlpool’.[1][note 1] The concept of chakra features in tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. The Texts and teachings present different numbers of chakras. Also different physical structures are considered chakras. David Gordon White thus emphasizes: “In fact, there is no “standard” system of the chakras. Every school, sometimes every teacher within each school, has had their own chakra system.”[8]

Characteristics

The following features are common:

  • They form part of the body, along with the breath channels, or nadis, and the winds (vayus).
  • They are located along the central channel (sushumna/avadhūtī).
  • Two side channels cross the center channel at the location of the chakras.
  • They possess a number of ‘petals’ or ‘spokes’.
  • They are generally associated with a mantra seed-syllable, and often with a variety of colours and deities.

    Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chakra

  • The Doors – Riders on the Storm

    Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

    Chaos Theory

    Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

    Chaos theory is a field of study in mathematics, with applications in several disciplines including meteorology, physics, engineering, economics, biology, and philosophy. Chaos theory studies the behavior of dynamical systems that are highly sensitive to initial conditions—an effect which is popularly referred to as the butterfly effect. Small differences in initial conditions (such as those due to rounding errors in numerical computation) yield widely diverging outcomes for such dynamical systems, rendering long-term prediction impossible in general.[1] This happens even though these systems are deterministic, meaning that their future behavior is fully determined by their initial conditions, with no random elements involved.[2] In other words, the deterministic nature of these systems does not make them predictable.[3][4] This behavior is known as deterministic chaos, or simply chaos. This was summarised by Edward Lorenz as follows:[5]

    Chaos: When the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future.

    Chaotic behavior can be observed in many natural systems, such as weather.[6][7] Explanation of such behavior may be sought through analysis of a chaotic mathematical model, or through analytical techniques such as recurrence plots and Poincaré maps.

    Continue reading at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_theory

    See also

    Chaos (cosmogony)

    Chaos (Greek χάος, khaos) refers to the formless or void state preceding the creation of the universe or cosmos in the Greek creation myths, more specifically the initial “gap” created by the original separation of heaven and earth.

    Greek χάος means “emptiness, vast void, chasm, abyss”, from the verb χαίνω, “gape, be wide open, etc.”, from Proto-Indo-European *ghen-, cognate to Old English geanian, “to gape”, whence English yawn.[1]

    Hesiod and the Pre-Socratics use the Greek term in the context of cosmogony. Hesiod’s chaos has often been interpreted as a moving, formless mass from which the cosmos and the gods originated, but Eric Voegelin sees it instead as creatio ex nihilo,[2] much as in the Book of Genesis. The term tohu wa-bohu of Genesis 1:2 has been shown to refer to a state of non-being prior to creation rather than to a state of matter.[3][4] The Septuagint makes no use of χάος in the context of creation, instead using the term for גיא, “chasm, cleft”, in Micha 1:6 and Zacharia 14:4.

    Nevertheless, the term chaos has been adopted in religious studies as referring to the primordial state before creation, strictly combining two separate notions of primordial waters or a primordial darkness from which a new order emerges and a primordial state as a merging of opposites, such as heaven and earth, which must be separated by a creator deity in an act of cosmogony.[5] In both cases, chaos referring to a notion of a primordial state contains the cosmos in potentia but needs to be formed by a demiurge before the world can begin its existence.

    This model of a primordial state of matter has been opposed by the Church Fathers from the 2nd century, who posited a creation ex nihilo by an omnipotent God.[6]

    In modern biblical studies, the term chaos is commonly used in the context of the Torah and their cognate narratives in Ancient Near Eastern mythology more generally. Parallels between the Hebrew Genesis and the Babylonian Enuma Elish were established by H. Gunkel in 1910.[7] Besides Genesis, other books of the Old Testament, especially a number of Psalms, some passages in Isaiah and Jeremiah and the Book of Job are relevant.[8][9][10]

    Use of chaos in the derived sense of “complete disorder or confusion” first appears in Elizabethan Early Modern English, originally implying satirical exaggeration.[11]

    Continue reading at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_(cosmogony)

    A Boy and His Atom – the world’s smallest movie

    Monday, February 10th, 2014

    “A Boy and His Atom” – watch the world’s smallest movie made from atoms by IBM

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